Loving Mush While Despising The Meat

This coming Sunday, pastors from all over the world will be delivering sermons to their respective congregations. For the vast majority of people, topics will invariably be on how to have better sex, having a happier marriage, how to be a strong leader, parenting techniques, how to manage money, positive thinking, vision casting, spiritual lessons from blockbuster movies, and a host of other subjects.

These are not all irrelevant topics, perse, but are they really the BEST thing to be preaching on when we consider what is NOT being preached on?

How many pastors, if we were to survey their congregation and ask them to define and explain the Trinity, would feel confident that the bulk of the responses would not be some form or variation of  Arianism, Subordinationism, Adoptionism, Modalism, Polytheism, Monarchianism, Tritheism, Patripassianism, Appolinarianism, Socinianism, Monophysitism, or Nestorianism?

Suppose I ask them:

“Because God, Jesus, and the Holy Spirit are one, would it be fair to say that the Father is the Son, The Son is the Spirit, and the Spirit is the Father?”

How many people would answer ‘Yes’ to that question, or be unsure how to answer it? And how many people know that if they did answer in the affirmative, they would be affirming the heresy of Sabellianism and repudiating the Athanasian creed?

Some people argue that teaching on the Trinity in our modern-day evangelical congregations is too abstract, complicated, esoteric, and has no bearing or application in the real world. This viewpoint betrays a devastating lack of clarity in comprehending the purpose of preaching the whole counsel of God, particularly the elements that are primary issues to our faith. Deep, profound truths of theology that define our faith and our Lord are being untaught and ignored in exchange for comparative trivialities.

While I know that not everyone in a Church is going to have an seminary-level grasp of the Trinity, are the leaders of the Church confident that most people will have a strong grasp of it most of the time? How about some of the time? How many people in your own Church would be able to offer up a robust, Biblical explanation of the Trinity? Could they defend it from Oneness Pentecostals or their Muslim and Jehovah Witness friends and coworkers? To what degree of scrutiny can it withstand?

It’s not just the Trinity, but you can put a host of other fundamental doctrines here-

The Gospel.

Justification.

Sanctification.

The nature of God.

Etc.

If your congregation members can’t talk about it, explain it, understand it, define it, or defend it, is it possible that it might be more important that foundational things are taught before we embark on an 8 week series on how to manage one’s wealth or how to be a better leader?

For a great reference on the Trinity to help you better understand how it all works and why it’s so significant , check out THIS BOOK by Dr. James White.

One Comment Add yours

  1. Doug says:

    Your writing is not for the average person. It is written using language – words – that most people will not grab the gist of. Are you aware that the average newspaper is written at an 8th grade level these days, so the use of the “Howard Cosell” words, the “twenty” dollar words will cause the average person to stop reading.

    I don’t know if you attended a Christian College or University, but some of your language comes out of traditional post high school Christian School language. It typically doesn’t get used in day to day life or the church services have ever heard. I have only ever heard this language on Christian based tv / radio where the moderator is trying to sound more important than they are.

    The K.I.S.S. principle will gain you more readers than your current style.

    I disagree with your thoughts that preachers carry themes about sex through their messages, I don’t know who you listened to or do listen to but it doesn’t line up with the world I live in.

    Like

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